Archive for December, 2007

Artist Introduction: John Weeks

December 31, 2007

John WeeksHi, I’m John Weeks. I’ve been making comics since I could pick up a pencil, and distributed my first comics zine in junior high. I’ve done stuff in varied roles and formats, just google my ass if you’re curious.

Reading ‘Lo-Fi‘ & ‘DIY’ comicists (i.e. John Porcellino, James Kochalka, the Puppy Toss collective) encouraged me in to start QuickDraw in 1995, first in print, now on the web. My current gig is in Phnom Penh with ‘Our Books’, looking to grow and cultivate the comics world here.

In my free time I’ve experimented with doing weekly comics, most recently in conjunction with Illustration Friday. Living in Cambodia has given me some new challenges and plenty distractions, hence Comix Rehab.

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Artist Introduction: Sarah Howell

December 31, 2007

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My name is Sarah Howell and I avoid making comics everyday. I’ll surf the net, I’ll do my taxes, I’ll clean the bathroom, all to avoid making comics. Most insidious of all is my habit of designing and producing opportunities for other people to be creative.

I started off making the occasional mostly silent comic 1998 – 2000, they looked pretty but didn’t make a lot of sense. I didn’t make any comics for a few years after that and in the last three years I’ve drawn my journal entries as comics on and off, recently collecting a selection of these from 2007 into a zine.

I’m entering Rehab to commit to making work that has a bit more polish than my journal entry fare, though I may still keep the art fairly simple. I will be happy at the end if the posts have an overall narrative that keeps the attention of the reader.

Kicking this rehab off with the Alcoholics Anonymous prayer which came to me in a Christmas cracker.

“God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to distinguish the one from the other” – Reinhold Neibuhr (1892 – 1971) American Theologian

Good luck to my fellow rehabers and thank you to those who have been before.

Artist Introduction: Ross Radiation

December 31, 2007

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My name is Ross Radiation and I have been drawing for mini-comics and zines since 1995. I still do the occasional comic strip but my drawing focus has shifted towards designing posters and illustrations in the last few years. I need to go to comic rehab because I fear I am in serious danger of losing the ability to conceive and write stories, jokes or even simple cartoon sequences. Hopefully my stay here will help get the old creative mucus flowing again!

Artist Introduction: Miss Helen

December 31, 2007

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I’m 26 and I’ve been writing zines and drawing and photocopying for over 11 years. After being featured in Spectrum and debuting as a feature artist at the Penrith regional gallery, I’m finding the non existent pressure of a return to what I love best (ie. self publishing) a little overwhelming and have been spending far too much time on the internet faffing about, obsessing over things that I need not and buying superfluous and various plastic things over the internet, or eating christmas/new years leftovers. The only times I can bring myself to do actual creative things is either when I’m visiting my friend Vanessa’s house, or when I’ve got an objective in mind.

So I’m hoping the pressure of performance drawing (ha!) and support will inspire me to get off my internets and get into the sketch pad. Or something. Also I’m hoping the whole “blogging on a regular basis” thing will rub off on me, since mine is somewhat neglected

Round Three: Meet the artists

December 31, 2007

The participating artists for the January round of Comic Artist Rehab are:

Rehab exit interview: Clint Cure

December 30, 2007

1. Briefly describe your experience at comic artist rehab:

The 4 week program really helped me to get back on the comic track.

2. What, if anything, did you learn from the program?

I learnt that we should all try to just get along. I also learnt that I like to draw comics. Which I new before but I forgot.

3. Which one of your own comics are you most pleased with and why?

I like the one where we laugh in bed. I like how it’s drawn and it seems to work as a story and as a gag.

4. Which one of your own comics are you least pleased with and why?

I don’t like the last one. It doesn’t say much.

5. Do you hope to keep up drawing comics after rehab? If so, how often.

I’ll get into some comics I’ve been meaning to do but I won’t be drawing to a deadline, so not as often. Shame really.

6. Any suggestions for future rounds?

We need a holiday break. This is a travelling time of year. I found it really hard to get acess to the internet which is why this is late.

Rehab exit interview: Ive Sorocuk

December 30, 2007

1. Briefly describe your experience at comic artist rehab:

I had a ball! It felt great doing regular one page strips again, I really hope it becomes a habit for me. Early on I let myself get stressed out about the sizes and the layout but playing around with them is where I found the most fun.

As a reader it was cool to see what the others were up to each day. Tim was the only other artist this round I had heard of before and I’m a fan so it was great seeing regular strips by him while it lasted.

2. What, if anything, did you learn from the program?

I learned that deadlines work. I learned that the main problem I have in making comics is in the actual starting. Once I have one doodled out it takes so much weight off my brain.

3. Which one of your own comics are you most pleased with and why?

The second one I did with Bandit Ghost. It was such a simple easy to draw one and I love how it turned out coloured. “Story”wise it has a beat to it that I like and is unlike most comics I do.

4. Which one of your own comics are you least pleased with and why?

The New World War strip on Day Nineteen. I just feel I have drawn that same strip a million times. I’m setting things up and referencing past strips without adding anything and it ends without a punchline. I do like the look of it but wish I had spent as long writing it than I did drawing it.

5. Do you hope to keep up drawing comics after rehab? If so, how often.

Yeah! I planned to use Comic Artist Rehab to complete at least one story I have going so i’ll get onto that. I’m thinking of at least two pages a week for the next few months.

6. Any suggestions for future rounds?

None.

Rehab exit interview: Tempo Spindle

December 30, 2007

1. Briefly describe your experience at comic artist rehab:

This has been hands down one of the most rewarding experiences for me dealing with comics and the internet. I have fiddled about in isolation for a long time and it was really nice to get feedback that was not from friends and family. At the same time it was a little intimidating, everyone else that participated this round is in some way a professional artist. I am not. But I think I held my own and for once stuck to a schedule.

2. What, if anything, did you learn from the program?

That deadlines are doable for me. I would self impose them in the past, but they never felt that important, or I would get bogged down with something else. Because I was a part of a greater whole though, I felt compelled to not mess this up and in the end really got into the swing of things.

3. Which one of your own comics are you most pleased with and why?

This is a two fold answer for me. The best produced, in my opinion, was Day Eighteen. It is clean and understandable. Also I think I got used to using the digital font work in a way that looks organic. Day Twenty Two however is my favorite for stylistic reasons. Being a disciple of Scott McCloud I am always looking for a way to make things more iconic and evocative. It is a fools errand at best most of the time, but I like the way this comic comes together with an icon set that is simple and still manages to tell a story.

4. Which one of your own comics are you least pleased with and why?

Day Six hands down. I rushed the first comic after a marathon driving session but it still turned out the way I wanted it to (a little sloppy but the idea was there). Day Two should have been better, I knew what I had to do and when it was due, I had no other obligations to attend to. I got lazy and pushed back the drawing time until the last possible moment. I disappointed myself greatly with this entry.

5. Do you hope to keep up drawing comics after rehab? If so, how often.

Yes I do plan to stay actively drawing. I am thinking about keeping up the every four day rotation over on Amerigo Infernox, though in reality I think once to twice a week would be a better schedule. I also plan to redraw the comics I laid out here in rehab. I have some extra time and I think that the story itself actually makes a good intro for a character I did not mean to create (the bald cop) and a good segue for the mummy (Dead Eddie) who shows up in all of my previous comic ambitions.

6. Any suggestions for future rounds?

I think that all in all the format is solid. It would be nice to see more people gravitate over to this site and have it become a kind of regular destination for web comic fans. Indeed I believe that it has that kind of potential. It just needs a little more exposure across the whole of the internet, and that should just take time and a good amount of participation on the part of newcomers and alumni alike.

Rehab Exit Interview: Tim Danko

December 30, 2007

1. Briefly describe your experience at comic artist rehab:

Extreme highs and desperate lows as i felt myself stripped back to the very core of existence before heading out to rejoin my drugged life again…. sorry that was Lohans rehab. Until technical and physical difficulties threw me out of whack it was very pleasant and exhilirating to see what came out without planning or foresight under four day deadlines. Rythmic utopia.

2. What, if anything, did you learn from the program?

That i could make the deadline but to always have a safety back up. Trust my own inner resources to create.

3. Which one of your own comics are you most pleased with and why?

I think around four five six the comics hit to the meat of something, early on they were a bit thin and then last round finally too complex. this will change with further distance and i can fully ‘get’ what really came out in the comics.

4. Which one of your own comics are you least pleased with and why?

My last one felt unsatisfying to me. Maybe i hit the conclusion too early.

5. Do you hope to keep up drawing comics after rehab? If so, how often.

I draw comics every day anyway. Most of the source for my rehab strips were from one of my daily books. I set up a structure for the book i am drawing in to allow it to be like free diving. The book i used for rehab is limited to black blue and white.

6. Any suggestions for future rounds?

God like interference in the personal lives of rehabbers by the moderators. Removal of all contact with the outside world for all rehabbers and a strict regime of menial daily chores.

Round Two: Day Twenty Eight

December 28, 2007

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This strip has taken on a variety of forms but is still a bit rushed. It’s my last for this round. After all my bleak material I wanted to say that I’m OK now, I have a new girlfriend and I’m happy. But, of course, she gets drunk the other night and tells me she’s screwing another guy and in love with someone else… and the world spins on.